(Source: TheWrap.com) The guy who wrote “Puff the Magic Dragon” says that 2D cinema is dead.

Ordinarily, the opinion of a one-hit songwriter might not matter much in the world of entertainment technology – but in this case, the songwriter who penned the lyrics to Peter, Paul and Mary’s classic at the age of 19 also happens to be the so-called father of 3D cinema, and the closest thing to a rock star that the field has to offer.

Lenny Lipton, the songwriter and 3D guru in question, gave the closing keynote address at Monday’s 3DNext Summit in Culver City, where his status as a 30-year stereoscopic-cinema veteran responsible for a variety of innovations made him the biggest celebrity on the program.

And in contrast to many of those who’d preceded him preaching caution, Lipton was adamant that the future is 3D, and the future is now.

Lenny LiptonThe reason: money.

“People won’t admit it, but it’s all over for 2D cinema,” said Lipton, who holds more than 40 patents in the field of stereoscopic cinema and wrote the book “Foundations of Stereoscopic Cinema” in 1982. “And it’s not for creative reasons. It’s for business reasons.”

Bussinessmen in the entertainment industry, Lipton said, have always embraced “new modalities” that allow them to increase prices. “There are remarkable parallels between the introduction of the sound cinema and the stereoscopic cinema,” he said, displaying a chart that also included the innovations of motion, sound, color, widescreen and stereoscopic

“In every case, exhibitors are able to charge more money. And that’s why 3D cinema isn’t going away.

“You can’t turn off color, you can’t turn off sound, you can’t turn off 3D, and you can turn off the up-charge.”

After stints at the StereoGraphics Corporation, which he founded in 1980, and later at RealD, Lipton has now founded a new company, Oculus3D, which has created a 3D theatrical format that can use 35 mm projectors rather than requiring the more expensive digital projection equipment.

His stats: outfitting 100 screens with digital 3D costs $1.5 million, while 100 screens using the Oculus 3D 35 mm technology runs $230,000.

“If I’m right, and stereoscopic cinema becomes ubiquitous, does that mean all the smaller theaters go out of business?” he asked. “They need a solution, and they can’t afford digital.”

Full Article: TheWrap.com



Write a comment


Name




    
Nmancer’s TekLog is based on WordPress platform, RSS tech , RSS comments design by Gx3.