(Source: Examiner.com) Special effects have long been the magic that creates the most important parts of the movies. From generating CGI fantasy characters to explosions to new camera effects and innovations such as sound and color, it is easy to say that modern film wouldn’t exist without the special effects department. To this day, they still are responsible for color, sound, and some of the great technological innovations that have brought us movies like The Lord of the RingsHarry Potter, and the upcoming Avatar. Of course, most special effects started simply enough. Without everything from stop-motion animation to technicolor to 3D and even Smell-O-Vision, film would not be what it is today.



(Source: Hollywood Reporter)   As it expands its circle of producers, Sony Pictures Animation has struck a multiyear, first-look deal with Fred Seibert and his Frederator Studios to develop animated features.

A former president of Hanna-Barbera Prods., Seibert founded Frederator in 1998. He has produced 16 series for television, including Butch Hartman’s “The Fairly Oddparents,” Genndy Tartakovsky’s “Dexter’s Laboratory” and Craig McCraken’s “The Powerpuff Girls.”

Eric Robles’ “Fanboy & Chum Chum” will debut on Nickelodeon in October, and Pendleton Ward’s “Adventure Time” launches in May on Cartoon Network. Frederator also has “Samurai Jack” in development at Paramount with Bad Robot Prods.

(Source: filmschoolrejects.com) It seems that every year we’re introduced to some film that proposes itself to display the newest advancements in digital imaging technology. Occasionally these films even use the term revolutionary to describe how forward-moving their implementation of such technology is—not only revolutionary within the history of digital image creation, but revolutionary in its transformative potential of the medium of cinema itself. Such manufactured buzz has, of course, been attached to James Cameron’s long-awaited Avatar, and this buzz predictably came to a halt with the release of the film’s trailer. If the trailer had been witnessed by audiences without the context of buzz so thoroughly propagated by Fox—if it were released, for instance, without Comic-Con, “Avatar Day,” or months upon months of non-teasing teaser photographs and footage—the trailer would have came across simply as an ad for an entertaining-looking sci-fi blockbuster popcorn flick from a highly respected and reliable filmmaker. But with hyperbolic language like “revolutionary” attached to the film for quite some time, the seemingly standard—if not sometimes unconvincing—quality digital effects of the trailer could not have made the trailer anything but disappointing.



(Source: LATimes.com)  Three companies belonging to Derek Anderson and Victor Kubicek, owners of the “Terminator” franchise rights and producers of May’s “Terminator Salvation,” filed for Chapter 11 reorganization in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Los Angeles Monday, the same day that the two producers sued their primary investor and one of its former employees.

Although “Terminator Salvation” has sold a healthy $370 million worth of tickets around the world and has yet to be released on DVD, Anderson and Kubicek didn’t make a payment demanded by Santa Barbara hedge fund Pacificor, which financed their $30-million purchase of the “Terminator” rights in 2007 and made two subsequent loans to their Halcyon Co. production firm worth $9 million.

    
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