Sometimes mods go to such lengths that words like ‘homebrewed’ and ‘DIY’ no longer do them justice. Presenting the Nintendo SNES Portable. Not the first, and probably not the last of its kind, this bad boy mobilizes Nintendo’s venerable console with a few buttons from a PSOne controller and a ridiculously detailed skinning job — yes, even the packaging gets a makeover. The sheer nostalgic overload at the sight of it must be worth something to Nintendo, no? There’s not a person, with both a heart and a history of gaming, that can glance at that bulky unwieldy-looking thing and not break into a wistful smile. Really, we dare you. More snaps after the break.




(Source: winnipegsun.com) The aliens of District 9 may have landed in South Africa, but they were born in Canada.

The startlingly realistic effects of the science-fiction thriller are the handiwork of Vancouver studios Image Engine, The Embassy and Zoic, all of which contributed to the extraterrestrial “prawns” and their bio-mechanized weaponry.

The Canadian connection isn’t entirely surprising since director and co-writer Neill Blomkamp lives in Vancouver.

So when Weta Digital — producer Peter Jackson’s New Zealand-based effects house — was unable to complete the District 9 workload, the first-time feature director turned to the technicians he knew from his own background as a computer animator, visual-effects designer and commercial helmer.



(Source: guardian.co.uk) It’s so much better when not everything is done with computers

Don’t get me wrong, I’m no luddite; I’m not taking time off from smashing them newfangled mechanical looms to write this on my witchcraft-powered magical typewriter. CGI has made a lot of great things possible in movies, it’s just that it’s done so at the expense of a great many still-viable skill sets that will soon vanish into history. It’s also made everyone an “expert” on special effects – “Oh, it’s all done with computers”. It’s a complicated process, but with such an overly simplistic assessment of it so prevalent, movie-making has lost a great deal of mystery and ingenuity.


(Source: examiner.com) Stephen King has signed over the rights to his Dark Towers series–considered by many fans his definitive and best work–to J. J. Abrams and Damon Lindelof (Lindelof isn’t as well known a name as Abrams, but he was the co-creator of Lost).

The Dark Towers series (made up of seven full novels) is a sort of hybrid of the western and fantasy genres, an epic tale of gunslinging and transportation through time, and a commentary on, connection to, and culmination of King’s work as a writer.

    
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