(Source: TUAW) Sometimes, when I see something new, I have to smack myself in the head and think: “Why didn’t I think of that?” Remember the old V8 Juice commercials? I just heard about one of these and It’s the X-Power1 USB Rechargeable Battery Backup Cable from Xmultiple.

It looks like a USB charging cable swallowed a AA battery. What’s inside is a lithium-ion battery with more capacity than built into any current iPhone or iPod. Using this cable, sync or charge your device while the internal cable battery charges. It will take about 3 hours to fully charge. Then when your device runs out of juice, plug in the cable and get power while you charge your device’s battery.

I spoke with Alan Pocrass, the CEO of Xmultiple, and found that the information now circulating around the Internet is wrong. If you’ve already read something about the product, that information was based on a production prototype that will not be be built. The publicity picture is also inaccurate. The cable will work with iPhones, iPod touches and USB-charging iPods only, so earlier iPod owners (those that charge via Firewire) are out of luck.

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(Source: TUAW) Apple’s long-awaited free iDisk (iTunes link)program brings some great new features that makes MobileMe more appealing. But, there are a few holes and the program certainly doesn’t do everything.

Basic layout
When you launch the iDisk app, you’ll see most of folders that you normally have access to in your iDisk, plus any other folders that you might have created. What you won’t see are the Backup, Sites, Software and Web folders that are normally in your iDisk. You can access these folders by enabling them through the software settings. Pressing the edit button will allow you to delete any user-made folders you’ve added to iDisk, but you can’t create new folders.

Along the bottom are buttons for the iDisk itself, recent files viewed, files that you’ve chosen to share and public folders you’ve subscribed to. The settings screen is pretty basic, but leads to one of the gems of this piece of software — an extremely documented help section that goes over every aspect of the app.

(Source: TUAW) The Eye-Fi Memory Card sends photos wirelessly from your camera to the destination of your choice, like a computer or the web. Back in January of ‘08, the product gained Mac and iPhoto support, and support for MobileMe was added in September ‘08. 

This week, Eye-Fi announced the Eye-Fi 2GB Geo, which is currently exclusive to Apple retail, both online and brick-and-mortar stores. As you’ve probably guessed, the Geo adds geotagging to the mix. Once snapped and tagged, photos will be sent to a folder on your Mac or directly to iPhoto, all tagged and ready to go. This makes great use of iPhoto ’09’s Places feature.

It’s $60 for a 2GB card, which is cheaper that most of thegeotagging add-on hardware we listed a couple months back. If you pick one of these up, let us know how it goes.

Additionally, there’s a Eye-Fi app for the iPhone [App Store link] that lets you send photos to your Mac or certain online services direct from your phone.

    
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