Harrison Ford’s blaster from BLADE RUNNER, an original 1931 FRANKENSTEIN movie poster, Charlton Heston’s PLANET OF THE APES costume, Darth Maul’s lightsaber from THE PHANTOM MENACE and the CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON mask are just a sample of the Hollywood memorabilia up for grabs at the Profiles in History Auction being held April 30 and May 1.



(Source: reelzchannel.com)   How many exclamation points are there in Avatar? For most fans, and even for jaded journalists at the New York Times, it is clearly a lot. The Times surveyed the growing hype around Avatar this weekend and concluded that about the only thing it is not reasonably expected to do is cure cancer. A lot of the focus is on the new 3-D technology that is being taken out for its first real field test in Avatar. The breathless response of a technology writer for Time who got to see just the first 15 minutes of the movie is a fair sample:



Earlier today, ComingSoon.net had a rare opportunity for an extended interview with filmmaker Steven Soderbergh for his upcoming film The Girlfriend Experience, a timely film about a high-priced Manhattan escort played by adult video star Sasha Grey.

We had a chance to talk to Soderbergh at length about the film as well as his next two studio projects, The Informant and Moneyball, which reunite him with Matt Damon and Brad Pitt, respectively, but the real surprise came at the end of our conversation.



(Source: denofgeek.com) We find ourselves desperately hoping it succeeds, given that Pixar seems to be taking more cold, hard risks than any other major studio out there

The riskiest film of the summer is already attracting its fair share of naysayers. But what\u2019s the concern over Pixar\u2019s Up?

Published on Apr 30, 2009

Last year’s battle between Pixar and DreamWorks for the family animated movie demonstrated the clear distinction between how the two of them go about their work. DreamWorks gave us the bright Kung Fu Panda, a film chock-full of big name voice talent, names that the studio then made a hearty part of the advertising campaign. Pixar gave itself, however, a much harder sell with the far riskier Wall-E, a film that for 40 minutes at least was jaw-droppingly strong, before turning into a more conventional kids’ movie.



(Source: moviesblog.mtv.com)  It’s another time-travel movie from the man behind the “Back to the Future” trilogy. It’s a chance for Jim Carrey to play a handful of characters at once. And it’s yet another leap forward for a cinematic technology that was scoffed at when it was widely used for the first time in a big budget film.“A Christmas Carol” utilizes the same motion-capture technology that was panned in 2005’s “The Polar Express” (those dreaded “dead eyes,” which left Tom Hanks looking less than human) and applauded in 2007’s “Beowulf” (Angelina Jolie rising provocatively from a murky lake). Since then, the computer-driven capabilities have only increased, and the special effects wizard working side-by-side with director Robert Zemeckis (“Back to the Future”) on “Christmas Carol” can’t wait for audiences to get a peek at what they were able to pull off.



(Source: marinij.com)  Dorianne Tanaka doesn’t speak Klingon. She can’t list the four founding members of the United Federation of Planets. And despite her fondness for the original “Star Trek” series, the Lucas Valley resident said she has little interest in its spin-offs, such as “Voyager,” “Enterprise” or even “Next Generation.”

Yet Tanaka isn’t surprised that auto insurance company Esurance has chosen her as the nation’s biggest Trekkie.

“Traditionally, people think of ‘Star Trek’ fans as having detailed knowledge of every episode,” said Tanaka, dressed in the short red uniform of communication officer Lt. Uhura. “To me, it’s more about capturing the values of the show: respect, love, courage. That’s what made a lasting impression on me. That’s what we included in our fan film.”



(Source: Variety)  Paramount is calling off the May 8 launch of “Star Trek” in Mexico because of the swine flu epidemic, while Sony is debating whether to do the same with sequel “Angels and Demons.”

J.J. Abrams’ “Star Trek” will open day and date in other major territories May 8.

“Angels,” the follow-up to “The Da Vinci Code,” is opening around the world May 15.

Twentieth Century Fox was the studio most immediately impacted by the outbreak of the flu in Mexico, since “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” is opening day and date Friday. Studio’s international team made the decision over the weekend to cancel the opening of “Wolverine” in Mexico, along with the premiere.

(Source: ZeroPaid) According to a trade body, the TV and movie industry in Britain to be insignificant in 5 years without intervention from the industry and the government. The report comes just a few months after a conflicting report suggests that the movie industry is having another record-breaking year in profits.

After reading the two separate reports, one may find themselves asking something along the lines of, ‘how many billions in profits does it take to run an entertainment industry anyway?’ Apparently, record breaking profits won’t be enough to keep one industry afloat for long – that is, if a new report from The Guardian is anything to go by.

(Source: latimes.blogs) The late Forrest J. Ackerman dedicated his life to amassing what many consider to have been the world’s largest personal collection of science fiction, fantasy and horror memorabilia. On Thursday, about 500 remnants of his prized cache will go on the block as part of a larger auction of Hollywood collectibles. (The auction has plenty of other historic Hollywood totems, among them this mask from classic 1954 monster tale ”The Creature from the Black Lagoon.”)

Among the Ackerman-owned items for sale are the ring worn by actor Bela Lugosi in the 1931 film “Dracula,” Lugosi’s vampire cape from “Plan 9 From Outer Space” and other movies and his robe from “The Raven.”

(Source: io9) There is a lot of talk about J.J. Abrams ‘Star Trek’ and it’s excessive use of lens flares. These lens flares can be seen in the trailers and footage from the film and they are used throughout the whole movie it is part of the films signature. So I guess the question is was their an overuse of lens flares in the movie? Having seen the movie I would say not at all. For me I felt the flares added something different and unique to the film. I personally didn’t find them distracting so I wouldn’t worry about it. When J.J. Abrams was asked about the his use of lens flares and what he did to get them he replied:

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