Remember the recent unconfirmed quotes from the BBC that a version of the iPlayer was coming for the hallowed iPhone? Well in a surprise move, no doubt trying to gain a little momentum with today’s SDK furore, a limited selection of shows from the iPlayer have been made available to UK residents on their iPhones. It’s worth noting, however, that the service makes use of existing technologies on the iPhone — not anything announced today.

Couldn’t stop refreshing the various liveblogs covering the Apple SDK event? Neither could we. Fortunately, in case you missed any key details, Apple has now posted a streaming video of the entire presentation. Just the thing to watch while you wait, and wait, and wait for your copy of the SDK to download. (Seriously, developer.apple.com is getting hammered like a steel drum at Carnival in Rio.)

Here’s what you need to build your next, earth shattering, application for the iPhone and iPod touch:

  • Mac OS X Leopard
  • An Intel-based Mac (sorry, PowerPC folks — this one’s an Intel-only show)
  • Xcode
  • a free Apple iPhone developer account and the SDK itself — note that access to the SDK is not going to cost you ninety-nine bucks. It’s free, though getting the application approved and out onto devices will set you back the $99.

One of the most surprising announcements from today’s Apple shindig was the iFund from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. This $100 million fund will invest in companies, large or small, that want to develop innovative apps for both the iPhone and the iPod touch.

The iFund will invest anywhere from $100,000 to $15 million in funds for iPhone development. Check out the FAQ for more details.

Today, Steve Jobs announced the App Store to go along with all of the SDK fun that’s soon to begin. Available in the iPhone 2.0 software update, the App Store will allow for easy navigation of both paid and free apps; Featured, Just Added, Staff Favorites, Most Popular … it’s basically an iPhone version of Apple Downloads. You’ll be able to search, tap and download applications wirelessly to your iPhone (and iPod touch for a nominal fee) via WiFi or cellular. You’ll also be able to install apps via iTunes.

While Apple did not release any games at today’s event they did begin to show what’s possible with several tech demos. Apparently the SDK has only been available for the last two weeks or so, even inside Apple, which makes what they showed that much more impressive. First up, a team inside of Apple cooked up “Touch Fighter,” which appears to be a kind of space-based shooter that you steer by tilting and aim by pointing. The game is 3D and uses OpenGL graphics.

Ready to crack on and unleash some applications for the iPhone later this year? Be sure to set aside $99 to get your application onto the store however, as Ars Technica reports “Developers have to register with [Apple]. For that $99, we give them an electronic certificate that tells us who they are …. if they write a bad app, we can both track them down and we can turn off the app’s distribution”.

In addition to the $99 licensing charge to distribute the application (whether it’s a free or commercial app) companies seeking a proprietary solution will need to cough up another $200 ($299 total) for the ‘Enterprise Programme’.

Today Apple announced that they have licensed ActiveSync from Microsoft to enable full Exchange integration with the iPhone. The first thing you think of with ActiveSync is Push Email (that’s when email is sent to your iPhone as soon as it is received, as opposed to on a schedule like every 15 minutes). ActiveSync includes that as well as:

  • Wireless calendar syncing
  • Wireless contact syncing
  • Remote wipe of the device if it is lost

This goes way beyond simple email, folks. This only works when you’re connected to an Exchange backend though, so don’t be afraid that someone can randomly wipe all the data from your iPhone.

Argosy Publishing, an award-winning interactive, visual content developer, today officially launched The Visible Body (www.visiblebody.com), the first free, Web-based 3D interactive model of the human body.

Initially developed for educators, and health and medical professionals, The Visible Body is a next-generation, professional-grade platform that demonstrates how the human body works.

It will also be of interest to individuals with a deep appreciation for the human anatomy and science.

The Visible Body allows all users to visualize the human body and quickly and easily explore areas of interest to see how more than 1,700 anatomical structures — including major organs and systems — work together.

The leaders of the Screen Actors Guild on Tuesday sent an email message to members expressing strong reservations about the contract signed last week by the Screen Directors Guild and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers. President Alan Rosenberg and Executive Director Doug Allen wrote, “Some have rushed to anoint their deal as the ’solution’ for the entertainment industry. We believe that assessment is premature.” The two acknowledged that they had only seen a press release containing information about the deal between the directors and studios and not the contract itself, but nevertheless warned, “Because so much of the new DGA/AMPTP deal is unknown, no one should assume this new deal is a template for anyone else, certainly not for actors.” Their message immediately drew fire from Directors Guild President Michael Apted, who charged, in effect, that the SAG leaders were jumping the gun by commenting on a deal before they learned its full details.

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