Are you interested in a documentary about MMOs (primarily WoW)? Good, because one is coming. Second Skin, made by Pure West Films, follows the travails of addicts, guild leaders and assorted MMO-dwellers as they get addicted, fall in love, pwn noobs and otherwise get lootz.

Check out the brand new trailer at Second Skin’s official site.

What happens when two of the giant undersea cables that provide internet to a country get severed for some accidental reason? 70% of Egypt’s internet gets knocked out, that’s what.

All of Egypt’s web traffic has been shifted to a 3rd cable, but there isn’t enough bandwidth to go around.

Egypt’s Ministry of Communications and Information Technology (basically, their IT department) has warned that “people who download music and films are going to affect businesses who have more important things to do.”

Hey! Egyptian kids, stop all the downloading.

Even though Apple’s stock prices are in the slumps, iTunes usage is certainly not! Website Optimization posted that iTunes has surpassed RealPlayer usage in terms of online streaming — for the first time in history. They cite that iTunes was the only online streaming player that had a positive growth over year 2007. Here’s how the online players break down as of December 2007:

  • iTunes – 35,664
  • QuickTime – 12,787
  • RealPlayer – 27,565
  • Windows Media Player – 75,865

 

The above picture is a cheeseburger in a can.

Works like this: Buy it. Drop it in boiling water. Fish it out. Then you can has.

It sounds ridiculous at first, but then imagine it’s the post-Apocalypse and you’re the only one who stocked up on cheeseburger cans. Cha-ching!

Someone has dared to do a taste test and review here. Or you can just buy your own here.

That’s right folks — Garmin has just announced its new iPhone-like smartphone, the nüvifone. The device features full browsing, PIM, phone and of course, GPS functions. It’s an HSDPA, quad-band phone, also equipped with WiFi, Bluetooth and a somewhat familiar ultrathin design with full touchscreen support. The unit will use Garmin’s proprietary OS which is based on the UI its GPS units utilize, and sports a 3.5-inch LCD display… not unlike certain PNDs you know and love. There’s no word on price or release date, though the company swears we’re going to be hearing about it soon.

We realize Rock Band’s track listings aren’t exactly nuclear secrets or anything, but damn, Harmonix sure has a hard time keeping them under wraps. This month, the entire March schedule of downloadable songs have hit the internet, in the form of a scan of an advertisement from an as-yet unpublished Official Xbox Magazine.

Still could be fake, but it’s seems real to us. Here’s the list:

Week of March 4: Thrash Pack

  • Blinded By Fear - At The Gates
  • Thrasher – Evile
  • Shadow World – Haunted

Week of March 11:

  • Shooting Star – Bad Company *Cover*

The tie between spoken-books merchant Audible and iTunes has always been strong. Audible’s catalog forms the backbone of iTunes’ audio book offerings, and there’s a history of Audible offering iTunes-exclusive content. So it came as a surprise to me when Amazon bought Audible for $300 million, announced today. I’d imagine that the deal includes provisions for Apple’s existing contracts, but I’m curious as to how this will affect future negotiations. The Amazon/Audible deal is projected to close in the 2nd quarter of this year.

Surprise, surprise! Now after the shift to digital filmmaking is almost complete, we discover that archiving film for the future is more expensive than expected.

It used to be that when a motion picture studio was ready to archive a film, they packed the film, trailers, and assorted takes and shipped them off to a salt mine in Kansas or a limestone mine in Pennsylvania. It was a file-and-forget system that cost about $1,059 for the film’s master.

But then came digital, and everything changed. What’s astonishing is that the problem didn’t become public until recently when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences released the results of a yearlong study of digital archiving called “The Digital Dilemma.”

One of the casualties in the discussions relating to globalization seems to be semantics. In a recent NPR feature about Rhythm & Hues, a VFX studio based in Los Angeles, Mumbai, and Hyderabad, the commentator, Laura Sydell, seemed to have confused “offshoring” with “outsourcing.”

As most of us understand it, outsourcing is the wholesale deployment of a contractor or an outside vendor by a company to perform an operation that is part of the company’s business model. These contractors and vendors are hired by the company to “outsource” the operations in their business model.

(Source: features.cgsociety.org)             Between now and February 24, 12 visual effects professionals will be anxiously awaiting the moment that someone on stage at the Kodak Theater in Hollywood (assuming the writers’ strike has ended) opens an envelope to say, “And the Oscar goes to…”. These 12 Oscar nominees practiced their art on three films – four nominees for each – that the visual effects branch singled out during a process that began last fall.

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