(Variety) The visual effects budget for Warner Bros.’ “Green Lantern” has risen by $9 million, with new vfx houses recruited to bolster the team that’s been working overtime to meet the film’s June 17 launch.

The Warner Bros. pic will no doubt meet its date, but other effects-heavy films continue to scramble. In fact, the kind of sturm and drang that’s swirled around “Green Lantern” is actually par for the course on most visual effects-heavy tentpoles these days — and the problem’s growing.

Such pics now routinely fit the description of a “troubled” project, with “troubled” the new normal. And key players in the f/x biz say that with crunches mounting, it’s only a matter of time before some f/x-heavy tentpole can’t meet its delivery date — a nightmare no studio has faced since “Titanic.” Should a tentpole be forced to change dates, the ripple effects on a studio, its rivals, exhibitors and tie-ins will be widespread and injurious to bottom lines.

(Source: Variety) Darren Aronofsky will direct the Mandalay Pictures adaptation of Max Barry’s Machine Man, reports Variety.

The project, to be scripted by Mark Heyman (who co-wrote Aronofsky’s Black Swan alongside John McLaughlin) will adapt Barry’s story, which originally appeared on the author’s website in serial form with a single page released each day as it was written.

Machine Man, not to be confused with the Marvel Comics character, concerns a tech engineer who, tired of going through life average and unnoticed, replaces parts of his body with titanium upgrades of his own design. He then discovers that he isn’t the only one with plans for his new body.

(Source: nytimes.com) Warner Brothers agreed to keep Peter Jackson’s production of “The Hobbit” in New Zealand after the government promised to change local labor laws and offered extra financial incentives, Prime Minister John Key said Wednesday.

The deal came after two days of talks between Mr. Key and other government officials and executives from Warner and its New Line Cinema unit.

Filming of the two “Hobbit” movies, which is expected to start in February, had been threatened by a dispute over whether a New Zealand branch of an Australian union could engage in collective bargaining on the Hollywood films, which they have not been able to do in the past.

(Source: movies.sky.com) Ridley Scott’s proposed prequel to his 1979 horror hit Alien has stalled before production could even begin.

The director is at odds with the studio behind the project, 20th Century Fox, over budgetary and creative differences, according to sources close to the production.

It would seem Scott wants a budget of around $250m to make it a sci-fi spectacular, and is also pushing for an 18-rated level of violence and horror. Fox, however, don’t plan on investing anywhere near that sum, and are keen to get a 15 rating to maximise the audience appeal.

YouTube Preview Image

(Hollywood Reporter) As “Battleship” steams towards a start date this month, the pricey adaptation of the Hasbro board game is entering deep, treacherous waters.

With a budget of $200 million (£128.3 million) or more and no major movie stars on board, the Universal project is raising eyebrows among industry insiders who question whether the expensive gamble will pay off when the film comes out in 2012.

“It’s a big bet like many, many big bets from many studios,” Universal chairman Adam Fogelson told The Hollywood Reporter. “We will be nowhere near the high point and nowhere near the low point of what people are spending.”

(Source: TheWrap.com) The guy who wrote “Puff the Magic Dragon” says that 2D cinema is dead.

Ordinarily, the opinion of a one-hit songwriter might not matter much in the world of entertainment technology – but in this case, the songwriter who penned the lyrics to Peter, Paul and Mary’s classic at the age of 19 also happens to be the so-called father of 3D cinema, and the closest thing to a rock star that the field has to offer.

(Source: AP) Federal regulators on Monday allowed a new online exchange to proceed to trade future box-office receipts for movies.

A divided Commodity Futures Trading Commission approved the proposed futures contracts for the new Trend Exchange. That means the movie futures trading can proceed; it is expected to begin sometime in the third quarter.

Major Hollywood studios strongly oppose the idea. They say rival studios could sabotage films by betting against them.

In giving its approval, the CFTC said it found that box-office receipts fit the law’s definition of a commodity, that the Trend Exchange contracts aren’t “readily susceptible” to manipulation, and they provide a way of managing risk.



(Source: Variety) Last week’s FMX visual effects and animation conference in Stuttgart, Germany, featured presentations on “Alice in Wonderland” and the vfx of “Avatar,” as well as a presentation by Victoria Alonso on “Producing the Marvel Experience.”

While students and pros packed into the main Koenig-Karl Hall to learn about those hits, a smaller group nearby was taking in a program with more far-reaching implications: the “5D/Europe” conference.

In the FMX program, 5D is defined as “a global community of creative thinkers committed to exploring the vital role of design in the new collaborative and multi-disciplinary process of digital creation in all narrative media.”



(Soucre: darkhorizons.com)  Deadline  reports that producers Michael Shamberg and Stacey Sher (“Pulp Fiction,” “Erin Brockovich”) have optioned the film rights to Alan Goldsher’s music history fantasy parody novel “Paul is Undead”.

The story portrays John Lennon as a zombie guitarist from Liverpool who kills and reanimates his three bandmembers. The quartet create hits and bloody mayhem across the world as they snack on fans’ brains.

The book also features Mick Jagger as the UK’s best zombie hunter, and Yoko Ono as an eighth level ninja. There’s even a scene where Jesus agrees with a zombie John Lennon that the Beatles are bigger than him.

« Previous Articles    
Nmancer’s TekLog is based on WordPress platform, RSS tech , RSS comments design by Gx3.