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(Source: TUAW) Don’t even bother questioning why there is video of Jean-Luc Picard bashing Twitter and talking about his love for the iPhone, just watch and enjoy. Okay, okay, it’s from a PBS interview designed to promote some of their Shakespeare programming, but that doesn’t matter, really. All that matters is that Sir Patrick Stewart calls his “beautiful” iPhone “an extension of whom I am,” in the way that only he can.

He also bashes gaming, but only because he says it’s extremely addictive, so we’ll let that one slide. Here’s the really important question: Has anyone pointed out the Star Trek phaser [iTunes link] to him yet? What apps (besides the weather one, we guess) does he run on a daily basis?

(Source: AppleInsider) Apple’s cat-and-mouse game with the iPhone hacking community continues, as the handset maker has reportedly updated new shipping versions of the iPhone 3GS to prevent tampering.

According to iClarified, Apple has updated the BootROM for the iPhone 3GS to iBoot-359.32. This software upgrade is reportedly not vulnerable to an exploit hackers previously used to crack open the hardware.

A member of the iPhone Dev Team who goes by the handle MuscleNerd noted this is the first time ever that Apple has done a BootROM update in the middle of a product line, without a new hardware model. The Dev Team is a group of hackers who release tools used to exploit the iPhone OS.

Why? Because the iPhone sucks up network bandwidth on a rather massive scale. The article, available online, tells a story most iPhone users already know. 

AT&T was unprepared for the massive assault on the 3G network from phones that stream audio and video, and surf the web at a rate far higher than other smartphones.

The piece quotes AT&T Wireless exec John Donovan saying “It’s been a challenging year for us. Overnight we’re seeing a radical shift in how people are using their phones… There’s just no parallel for the demand.”

That won’t make AT&T customers any happier. A recent survey by Pricegrabber found that 34% of those that responded say they aren’t buying an iPhone because it is on AT&T. Many current customers say they’d like to be anywhere but AT&T with their iPhone, but it’s likely that a mass migration to Verizon or some other carrier might cause the same problems there.

AT&T has issued a press release today announcing that MMS will become active for iPhone users on September 25.

We’ve been working for the past several months to prepare our systems and network to ensure the best possible experience with MMS when it launches – and that launch date is: September 25 for iPhone 3G and 3GS customers. MMS will be enabled through a software update on that day.

AT&T points to the need for the company to build out its network infrastructure to handle the demands of heavy MMS messaging volumes as the primary reason for the delay in launching the service compared to carriers in other countries that have offered MMS since the launch of iPhone OS 3.0 in June.

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(Source: TUAW) Forget about everything else. The cool consumer rage is currently directed at AT&T. Pat Lee, a Chicago iPhone user, is asking the iPhone community to petition Apple to drop AT&T exclusivity. In this biting 30-second video, Lee suggests that disgruntled users voice their displeasure about “less bars in more places.” He points viewers to Apple’s feedback page to get their AT&T hate on. 

Created in Adobe After Effects, the video has great production values and a stinging message. Oh, and it’s not especially safe for work. So you might want to bookmark this for later.

Boy Genius Report has received a tip from a “pretty reliable source” claiming to have knowledge of several new features to be included in iTunes 9. The rumored features include support for Blu-ray media and visual organization of iPhone and iPod touch applications within iTunes, as well as some form of social networking/media integration.

One of the new additions to iTunes is said to include Blu-ray support which lines up nicely with a recent Apple Insider report about Apple integrating Blu-ray into their new iMac line-up. Something else that will most likely make a bunch of people happy is that we’ve been told iTunes 9 will finally include the ability to visually organize and arrange your iPhone and iPod touch applications. Something that wasn’t so clearly described was some kind of Twitter/Facebook/Last.fm integration. Maybe broadcasting what song you?re playing to your friends?

(Source: TUAW) Sometimes, when I see something new, I have to smack myself in the head and think: “Why didn’t I think of that?” Remember the old V8 Juice commercials? I just heard about one of these and It’s the X-Power1 USB Rechargeable Battery Backup Cable from Xmultiple.

It looks like a USB charging cable swallowed a AA battery. What’s inside is a lithium-ion battery with more capacity than built into any current iPhone or iPod. Using this cable, sync or charge your device while the internal cable battery charges. It will take about 3 hours to fully charge. Then when your device runs out of juice, plug in the cable and get power while you charge your device’s battery.

I spoke with Alan Pocrass, the CEO of Xmultiple, and found that the information now circulating around the Internet is wrong. If you’ve already read something about the product, that information was based on a production prototype that will not be be built. The publicity picture is also inaccurate. The cable will work with iPhones, iPod touches and USB-charging iPods only, so earlier iPod owners (those that charge via Firewire) are out of luck.

Chart showing mobile devices visiting Wired.com

Chart showing mobile devices visiting Wired.com

(Source: Wired.com) Apple’s iPhone and iPod Touch are the overwhelming favorites for mobile access to Wired.com.

Color us surprised.

While we knew that our readers use and are interested in iPhones, we weren’t prepared for just how drastically the logfile numbers skewed towards Apple’s mobile platform. Taken together, the iPhone and iPod Touch represent 91.6% of the mobile devices accessing Wired.com during June, 2009.

A new patent application from Apple suggests the company could be working on proprietary global positioning system software that would calculate road trip times and recommend routes, based on real-time data collected from numerous users, and uploaded to a centralized server.

In the recently revealed U.S. patent filing, Apple describes a system for obtaining drivers’ personal travel data and using it to estimate driving times. Such a system could take into account speed, time of day, location, driving patterns, season, route type and features, traffic information, road conditions and location data.

iphone lenses

(Source: Wired.com) If you want high-quality photos, a responsive and full-featured DSLR is the only way to go. But sometimes you don’t want to carry that bulky box around with you. With a couple of accessories, and a few megabytes of applications, you can turn the iPhone in your pocket into a rather capable replacement.

Interchangeable lenses

Photographers have a mantra: “It’s all about the glass.” It doesn’t matter how good the camera is if you mount a junky lens on the front. The iPhone 3GS has added a much better autofocus lens to the mix (you didn’t think that one extra lousy megapixel made all that difference, did you?) but it’s still limited in range.

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